FILM REVIEW: SOMETIMES ALWAYS NEVER

  Sometimes Always Never proves its only words. This UK dramedy is about a father and son’s complex relationship. It has an English sensibility and a profound love for the Scrabble board game. The result is a quirky and whimsical character study that feels like it pans out in real-time. This film at first was a…

DVD REVIEW: AGATHA CHRISTIE’S CROOKED HOUSE

  We all know the story where the butler did it. But Agatha Christie’s Crooked House isn’t like that. Published in 1949, the novel was one of the author’s favourite stories. This is also a beautifully-shot period film. It’s an adaptation that leads you down the garden path and around the maze of an eccentric family’s country house….

BOOK REVIEW: TIM COSTELLO – FAITH

  As the CEO of the World Vision charity, Tim Costello AO has often had to discuss faith. His latest book also deals with the topic of belief and how it can be used to highlight the things that humanity has in common as well as offering a vehicle for reconciliation and hope. This series…

COMEDY REVIEW: STEPHEN K AMOS @ ENMORE THEATRE SYDNEY (06.05.2016)

  Stephen K Amos knows Australians. The English comedian has been visiting our fine country for over a decade and he even has the nasally accent down pat. His show at the Enmore Theatre for the Sydney Comedy Festival was a rather clever look at life both in general as well as different observations and…

BOOK REVIEW: MARGARET ATWOOD – THE HEART GOES LAST

  Margaret Atwood is no stranger to writing, as this talented Canadian author has won the Booker Prize and been shortlisted for countless others. She has written over 40 novels but I am a stranger to her work and The Heart Goes Last is my first introduction to this prolific writer. The book was excellent…

FILM REVIEW: DEPARTURES (OKURIBITO)

  Departures (Okuribito) is a simple, Japanese film about some big subjects: love, life and death. This existential family drama was the winner of the Best Foreign Film Oscar in 2009. It is also a subtle and nuanced story where a Zen-like air means that even though the final message is poignant and meaningful, it is…

FILM REVIEW: INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

It’s 1961 in Greenwich Village and in a short time this city will become a Mecca for folk troubadours. This all started when a young man called Robert Zimmerman changed his name to Bob Dylan and became a legend. But Llewyn Davis’ life is taking a rather different route, it’s one that is as aimless…

THEATRE REVIEW: JANE AUSTEN IS DEAD @ NEW THEATRE

  “It’s a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife”. This is the first line from Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice and arguably where the one-woman, Sydney Fringe Festival show, Jane Austen Is Dead begins. The story is by an Austen devotee and like its contemporaries, Bridget Jones’s Diary and Amanda…

FILM REVIEW: YOU MAKE ME FEEL SO YOUNG

Some of you have seen it. Heck, some of you may have even been in a similar situation. You Make Me Feel So Young is centred on a deteriorating relationship between two American twenty-somethings. The film is the work of writer/director, Zach Weintraub who also doubles as the film’s star. He is the boyfriend of Justine (Justine Eister). After…